WHAT AILS YOU?

As a centre of excellence for correcting lower body muscular-skeletal pain, many patients come to us with a range of classic shin and calf problems. These include shin splints, posterior tibial tendonitis and Achilles tendonitis.

These injuries are most common amongst people who participate in high- impact sports and sports requiring lots of sharp or sudden changes in direction like tennis, basketball, dance and football. However, problems such as flat feet (over pronation) will also cause pain in the shin and calf area.

On this page, you will find an index of some of the conditions we deal with here at the BxClinic, including those that relate to pain in the shin and calf.

FRONT (ANTERIOR) SHIN & CALF

 

Lateral Shin


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    Fibula Injuries

    The Fibula bone runs up the outside of your shin and allows lots of your muscles to work correctly so injuring this bone can have many knock on effects.

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    Lateral Soleus Problems

    The Soleus is one of your calf muscles and can give you pain if it has to work too hard to stabilise your leg against your foot.

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    Perineal Problems

    These are pains that can affect the side of your calf or ankle. The Perineal muscles may even be hurt by a simple ankle sprain.

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    Shin Splints

    An umbrella term used for up to 31 different conditions giving you pain in the front or side of your shin.
    Learn more about shin splints

 

Anterior Ankle


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    Ankle Instability

    Continually spraining the ankle weakens the ligaments around the joint causing instability, swelling and ‘going over on your ankle’ without pain.

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    Ankle Stiffness

    The bones of the ankle stop moving freely over or against each other, restricting one or more of the movements of your ankle.

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    Arthritic Ankle

    When the joints in your foot do not work in unison or if they are placed under excessive stress, it can lead to inflammation of the joints (arthritis).

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    Foot Drop

    If you can’t lift your foot off the ground or if your toes drag when you walk it could be a sign of foot drop, damage to the nerve powering the muscles in your shin and top of your foot.

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    Sinus Tarsi

    Chronic ankle instability or poor biomechanics cause the small tunnel between the two bones underneath the ankle to become too mobile, damaging soft tissue structures.

 

Distal Medial Shin


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    Muscle Problems

    Several muscles that work your toes sit in your calf area. Pain deep in your calf or even your ankle, could be a sign that your toes are working too hard causing a pull in these muscles.

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    Posterior Tibial Problems

    Damage to the posterior tibial muscle will cause pain to the inside of your ankle or calf. If the muscle is injured your arch will start to lower and your foot become wider.
    Learn more about posterior tibial problems

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    Shin Splints

    An umbrella term used for up to 31 different conditions giving you pain in the front or side of your shin.
    Learn more about shin splints

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    Soleus Problems

    The Soleus is one of your calf muscles and can give you pain if it has to work too hard to stabilise your leg against your foot.

 

Proximal Medial Shin


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    Calf Pulls

    Your calf muscle works extremely hard to help control the way you walk and run. If the muscle fibres or tendon become over stretched or pulled too hard it can hurt for weeks, feel stiff and sore. We would probably suggest a combination of orthotics, stretches and exercises and foot manipulation therapy to assist your recovery.

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    Pes Anserinus (Goose Foot)

    This is a complex region of muscle tendons and bursas just below your knee on the inside of your shin. Pain here affects women more frequently than men.

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    Pulled Hamstring

    Your hamstring muscles pass behind your knee to attach around your shin bone. Pulled Hamstring muscles could be giving you calf or even knee pain.

 

Anterior Shin


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    Bruised Bone

    If the stress on your bone builds up and up over time the bone can become bruised. If the stress continues the bone may fracture giving you a continual pain when your foot is on the floor and sometimes when it isn’t.

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    Pulled Shin Muscle

    Several muscles that work your toes sit in your shin and calf area. Pain could be a sign that your toes are working too hard causing a pull in these muscles.

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    Shin Splints

    An umbrella term used for up to 31 different conditions giving you pain in the front or side of your shin.
    Learn more about shin splints

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    Stress Fractures

    As with Bruised Bones, stresses build up and up over time the bone can become bruised. If the stress continues the bone may fracture giving you a continual pain when your foot is on the floor and sometimes when it isn’t.

treating shin pain

TREAT YOUR SHIN OR CALF

Solve your problem with the right shin and calf treatments.


ACUPUNCTURE ORTHOSES STRETCHES & EXERCISES

BACK (POSTERIOR) SHIN & CALF

 

Achilles Tendon


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    Achilles Tendonosis (Tendonitis)

    Irritation and stiffness in the tendon that attaches the calf muscles to the heel bone.
    Learn more about achilles tendonitis

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    Achilles Tendon Nodule

    A small lump found within the Achilles tendon behind the ankle; this shows poor functioning of the tendon.

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    Previous Tendon Rupture

    If you have ruptured, or otherwise injured, your achilles tendon previously you will most likely be suffering from reduced ankle function and lack of ‘spring’ in your step.

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    Sever's Disease

    Unique to growing children, particularly active ones. The pull of the Achilles’ tendon is greater than the strength of its attachment to the heel and pain is felt at the Achilles.

 

Medial Calf


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    Pulled Calf Muscle

    The big calf muscle (Gastrocnemius) passes the knee and ankle, and when pulled too hard in both directions, results in pain.

 

Medial Soleus


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    Pulled Soleus

    The Soleus is one of your calf muscles and can give you pain if it has to work too hard to stabilise your leg against your foot.

 

Lateral Soleus


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    Pulled Toe Muscle

    Several muscles that work your toes sit in your calf area. Pain deep in your calf or even your ankle, could be a sign that your toes are working too hard causing a pull in these muscles.

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    Pulled Soleus

    The Soleus is one of your calf muscles and can give you pain if it has to work too hard to stabilise your leg against your foot.

 

Lateral Calf


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    Pulled Calf

    The big calf muscle (Gastrocnemius) passes the knee and ankle, and when pulled too hard in both directions, results in pain.

MOST COMMON SHIN & CALF CONDITIONS

Achilles Tendonitis

Swelling or inflammation of the Achilles commonly seen in runners and other athletes.
Your Achilles’ tendon has to control and direct the forces generated by your whole body as they enter the foot and those coming from your impact on the ground as they pass into your leg, this can be as much as twelve times your body weight.

Achilles Tendonitis – means swelling or inflammation of the Achilles. Two areas of the Achilles are prone to this: the middle section of the Achilles’ tendon and the insertion section where it joins the heel bone, known as Insertional Achilles tendonitis. The latter is commonly seen in runners and athletes.

Achilles Tendonitis is a common injury, but the pain appears in many forms. Each form is caused by different movements and your biomechanics. Symptoms can include inflammation and swelling, pain and stiffness. If left untreated repetitive trauma from walking and running will cause the tendon to degenerate.

Following detailed observation of your Achilles pain, BxClinic will assess which therapy will most appropriately help your recovery. This is likely to include orthotics, crafted insoles that fit inside your shoe or boot and support your foot, reducing the impact of your injury. Foot manipulation therapy, stretches and exercises and acupuncture will also help cure your Achilles Tendonitis.

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

Posterior tibial injuries are common amongst those participating in high-impact sports including dancers, runners and tennis players.
Damage to the posterior tibial muscle causes pain to the inside of your ankle or even your calf. The posterior tibial muscle is attached to the back of the shinbone and the tendon connects the muscle to the bones of the inner side of your foot. If this muscle is injured your arch will start to lower and your foot will become wider because the muscle cannot support the arch of the foot. This important muscle is responsible for decelerating your foot from rolling in and stabilising the inside of your ankle.

Posterior tibial injuries are common amongst those participating in high-impact sports including dancers, runners and tennis players.

We suggest a number of solutions at Norfolk’s BxClinic to improve the symptoms of posterior tibial tendonitis including precision made orthotics to support your arch and/or a tailor made programme of stretches and exercises. These solutions frequently eliminate the need to contemplate surgery.

Shin Splints

Shin splints are particularly common when athletes intensively increase their level of exercise without their bodies being correctly prepared.
An umbrella term used for up to thirty-one different conditions giving you pain in the front or side of your shin.

Shin splints are common amongst those who participate in high impact and rapid change of direction sports, for example, tennis and basketball. Runners who train on hard surfaces are at risk too. Shin splints are particularly common when athletes intensively increase their level of exercise without their bodies being correctly prepared. Shin splints will also affect those who have flat feet, weak ankles or are overweight.

Shin splint pain is felt in the inner part of the shin. If pain persists after resting the injury, it is likely that you have a biomechanical problem. The muscle, bone or attachments between them may be the injured part. Once we have assessed the cause of your pain, we will recommend one or a combination of the following treatments: strengthening through stretches and exercise, foot manipulation therapy and orthotics (shoe inserts).

FIND TREATMENT FOR YOUR SHIN OR CALF

Using foot pressure analysis, we will find the underlying cause of your shin and calf pain and provide relief through acupuncture treatment, exercises or orthotics as appropriate.